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Scholarship Post

The onset of the internet age has resulted in a more connected world, one with a vast amount opportunity and potential for the pursuit of education. Think about it for a second. There are just over 6 billion people in the world, and roughly forty percent of them have access to internet connectivity. That’s over two billion internet users, and dramatically counting each day. And, additionally, if the amount of internet users was not staggering enough, contemplate the amount of information available to these users. As of March 2010, global internet data traffic was estimated at over 21 exabytes per month. For the non- tech savvy, an exabyte is roughly estimated to 1 billion gigabytes of data traffic. With all this information available to an individual with just one click of a mouse, it’s possible to see the potential for great amounts of change in the world, especially in the way students explore the educational world.  My personal experience in education system highlights this fact, especially when relating to the research aspect of my education.

As a history and political science major, research is critical to my education; however, the way in which historians as well as political scientists both conduct and divulge into research as ultimately changed thanks to the internet. My father, a fellow history major, described to me the hassle of locating primary documents, first hand historical accounts, through the library system in his days at university. The horrors of inter-library loans, eye strain from the hours of examining mirco-film and even the inability of finding correct research with a limited university library were an all too real dilemma. While my education taught me to utilize the library system, most of the research I required was a couple of key strokes and a mouse click away. Primary documents once hidden away in museum achieves were now scanned and available to the public. The ability to become exposed to documents from outside the United States was also exposed to me. Different types of research had become available thanks to the internet, and could be used to broaden a student’s horizons on certain topics.

Furthermore, the access to research has become more widely available thanks to the internet. Before the age of the internet, political science research was hard to come by. Wanted to read a copy of a scholar’s examination into political behavior? Well, you had better have a subscription to a scholarly political science journal. Now with the onset of the internet most universities have partnered with resources like that of JSTOR to provide students with the ability to access all different types of scholarly journals.

Personally, the internet has drastically affected my education as well as the way I look at the world, and I think for the better. The ease of access and amount of access to research the internet has provided for my education has only helped expand my research on different global subjects. Global topics I assumed I had a great amount of knowledge in, were seen in new light. Research papers I thought were theoretically limited turned out possible to expand upon. New ideas and concepts were discovered from all over the world, and I have the internet to thank for that. 

Scholarship Post

The onset of the internet age has resulted in a more connected world, one with a vast amount opportunity and potential for the pursuit of education. Think about it for a second. There are just over 6 billion people in the world, and roughly forty percent of them have access to internet connectivity. That’s over two billion internet users, and dramatically counting each day. And, additionally, if the amount of internet users was not staggering enough, contemplate the amount of information available to these users. As of March 2010, global internet data traffic was estimated at over 21 exabytes per month. For the non- tech savvy, an exabyte is roughly estimated to 1 billion gigabytes of data traffic. With all this information available to an individual with just one click of a mouse, it’s possible to see the potential for great amounts of change in the education system.  My personal experience in education system highlights this fact, especially when relating to the research aspect of my education.

As a history and political science major, research is critical to my education; however, the way in which historians as well as political scientists both conduct and divulge into research as ultimately changed thanks to the internet. My father, a fellow history major, described to me the hassle of locating primary documents, first hand historical accounts, through the library system in his days at university. The horrors of inter-library loans, eye strain from the hours of examining mirco-film and even the inability of finding correct research with a limited university library were an all too real dilemma. While my education taught me to utilize the library system, most of the research I required was a couple of key strokes and a mouse click away. Primary documents once hidden away in museum achieves were now scanned and available to the public.

Furthermore, the access to research has become more widely available thanks to the internet. Before the age of the internet, political science research was hard to come by. Wanted to read a copy of a scholar’s examination into political behavior? Well, you had better have a subscription to a scholarly political science journal. Now with the onset of the internet most universities have partnered with resources like that of JSTOR to provide students with the ability to access all different types of scholarly journals.

Personally, the internet has drastically affected my education, and I think for the better. The ease of access and amount of access to research the internet has provided for my education has only helped expand my research. Topics I assumed I had a great amount of knowledge in, were seen in new light. Research papers I thought were theoretically limited turned out possible to expand upon. New ideas and concepts were discovered, and I have the internet to thank for that. And while the disadvantages include not being exposed to this research first hand, both the ease and amount of information available to access seem to counter this small disadvantage to students. 

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